Filtered results for:Everyday wear

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  1. A young girl's smocked dress
    1997

    The Embroiderers' Guild of WA Inc

    In the 20th century, sewing was an integral part of the Educational Curriculum in schools throughout Australia and most girls learnt to smock. When these girls became mothers, this training was used to make items for the home and garments for the family. Hand embroidery was a pleasurable pastime and form of relaxation.    Post WWII, when jobs and resources were limited and scarce, there was neither the range nor variety of goods and those that were available, comparatively expensive.  Quality ... more

  2. A religious habit of the Sisters of Mercy
    1920 - 1950

    Institute of the Sisters of Mercy of Australia and Papua New Guinea. ( ISMAPNG)

    This assembly of garments constitutes the basic elements of the religious habit of the Sisters of Mercy.&nbsp; The <em>Mercy habit</em> was designed by the Foundress of the Sisters of Mercy, the Venerable Mother Catherine McAuley, in Dublin in 1831, and, with possibly only minor and inconspicuous alterations, was worn by all Sisters of Mercy until the middle of the twentieth century. The habit then began to be simplified and was finally discarded in favour of modern garb more suited to ... more

  3. Striped cotton everyday dress
    1900 - 1910

    Coffs Harbour Regional Gallery and Museum

    This dress is significant as it is a cotton day dress and such dresses were usually worn everyday until they were only suitable for use as rags. For such a dress to have survived in such good condition is very unusual and adds greatly to the significance of this garment and the collection it belongs to. This dress is also significant as it is part of 100 piece collection of clothes that belonged to the Bayldon family who were important ... more

  4. Cream two piece outfit
    1890 - 1910

    Coffs Harbour Regional Gallery and Museum

    This garment is significant as it is part of a 100 piece collection of clothes that belonged to the Bayldon family who were important members of Coffs Harbour society from 1870 to the present day. The Bayldons were a very important family in the history of the Sawtell and Toormina region of New South Wales, just South of Coffs Harbour and this is remembered even today. When the local council established a new housing estate near Sawtell it was called ... more

  5. Rust brown two piece outfit
    1890 - 1910

    Coffs Harbour Regional Gallery and Museum

    This garment is significant as it is part of 100 piece collection of clothes that belonged to the Bayldon family who were important members of Coffs Harbour society from 1870 to the present day. The Bayldons were a very important family in the history of the Sawtell and Toormina region of New South Wales, just South of Coffs Harbour and this is remembered even today. When the local council established a new housing estate near Sawtell it was called Bayldon ... more

  6. Mustard two piece outfit for lady
    1880 - 1900

    Coffs Harbour Regional Gallery and Museum

    This garment is significant as it is part of 100 piece collection of clothes that belonged to the Bayldon family who were important members of Coffs Harbour society from 1870 to the present day. The Bayldons were a very important family in the history of the Sawtell and Toormina region of New South Wales, just South of Coffs Harbour and this is remembered even today. When the local council established a new housing estate near Sawtell it was called Bayldon ... more

  7. Port Arthur Convict Issue Parti-Coloured Waistcoat
    1855 - 1877

    Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery

    This waistcoat was issued to a convict transported from Britain to Van Diemen's Land (now Tasmania). It was part of the issued uniform given to Port Arthur convicts during the operation of the penal system 1830 - 1877. Seven classes of prisoner were created in 1826 during Governor Arthur's period of office. Clothing for convicts were mostly blue or grey. The lowest convict class wore yellow, the colour then associated with humiliation. Port Arthur was reserved for repeat-offending criminals, with ... more

  8. Port Arthur Convict Parti-Coloured Uniform Trousers
    1830 - 1877

    Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery

    These trousers were issued to a convict transported from Britain to&nbsp;Van Diemen's Land (now Tasmania). They were&nbsp;part of the issued uniform given to the Port Arthur convicts during the operation of the penal system on the Tasman Peninsula 1830 - 1877. Seven classes of prisoner were created in 1826 during Governor Arthur's period of office. Clothing for convicts was mostly blue or grey, the lowest convict class were compelled to wear yellow, the colour then associated with humiliation. Port Arthur ... more

  9. Port Arthur Convict Issue Parti-Coloured Waistcoat
    1855 - 1877

    Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery

    This waistcoat was&nbsp;issued to a convict transported from Britain to Van Diemen's Land (now Tasmania). It was part of the issued uniform given to Port Arthur convicts during the operation of the penal system 1830 - 1877. Seven classes of prisoner were created in 1826 during Governor Arthur's period of office. Clothing for convicts were mostly blue or grey. The lowest convict class wore yellow, the colour then associated with humiliation. Port Arthur was reserved for repeat-offending criminals, with inmates ... more

  10. Men's underpants made from tram destination roll fabric
    1940 - 1945

    The Australian Museum of Clothing and Textiles

    Historic significance: The garment was produced during a time of austerity and frugality. World War II had brought about rationing on a national level on all commodities, from soap to building materials. Ration books and coupon books were the only way to purchase goods and materials, including fabrics for dressmaking, so women looked to other clever ways of making up for the shortfalls in their household requirements. This woman and possibly the other wives of the men working at the ... more

  11. Florence Austral red & black blouse
    1920 - 1930

    The Australian Museum of Clothing and Textiles

    "The Waters of the Rhine seem to mount high, and over all rides the triumphant voice of Florence Austral as Brunnhilde. Her singing can justly be called queenly. Even after hearing the glorious singing of Frida Leider on other records, Austral's triumphant voice remains in the mind." -Neville Cardus, Manchester Guardian, 1928. Florence Austral was a prominent figure in the opera world in the early 20th Century. &nbsp;It was in 1914 that Austral won first place in two voice catagories ... more

  12. A girl's smocked romper suit. Design "Old Friend".
    1996

    The Embroiderers' Guild of WA Inc

    This romper was based on a pattern by Margaret Herzfeld in the 1990s&nbsp;for the "Australian Smocking and Embroidery" magazine and for smocking lessons.&nbsp;Through her teaching and publications, Margaret helped to keep the old skills alive, adapted them, and made them available to new generations when they were not longer taught in schools. She used her considerable talents to teach in Western Australia and interstate, designed original garments for &ldquo;Australian Smocking and Embroidery" magazine and established a business making smocked garments ... more