Filtered results for:Everyday wear

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  1. Port Arthur Convict Issue Parti-Coloured Waistcoat
    1855 - 1877

    Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery

    This waistcoat was issued to a convict transported from Britain to Van Diemen's Land (now Tasmania). It was part of the issued uniform given to Port Arthur convicts during the operation of the penal system 1830 - 1877. Seven classes of prisoner were created in 1826 during Governor Arthur's period of office. Clothing for convicts were mostly blue or grey. The lowest convict class wore yellow, the colour then associated with humiliation. Port Arthur was reserved for repeat-offending criminals, with ... more

  2. Yellow Wool Port Arthur Issue Convict Jacket
    1855 - 1877

    Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery

    This jacket was issued to a convict transported from Britain to Van Diemen's Land (now Tasmania). It was part of the issued uniform given to Port Arthur convicts during the operation of the penal system 1830 - 1877. Seven classes of prisoner were created in 1826 during Governor Arthur's period of office. Clothing for convicts were mostly blue or grey, the lowest convict class were compelled to wear yellow, the colour then associated with humiliation. Port Arthur was reserved for repeat-offending ... more

  3. Yellow Wool Port Arthur Issue Convict Waistcoat
    1830 - 1855

    Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery

    This waistcoat was issued to a convict transported from Britain to Van Diemen's Land (now Tasmania). It were part of the issued uniform of Port Arthur convicts during the operation of the penal system on the Tasman Peninsula 1830 - 1877. Seven classes of prisoner were created in 1826 during Governor Arthur's period of office. Clothing for convicts was mostly blue or grey, the lowest convict class were compelled to wear yellow, the colour then associated with humiliation. Australian convicts ... more

  4. Hallie's Hat
    1960 - 1970

    Rottnest Island Authority

    Hallie's Hat was made by Hallie Margaret Stow (1876-1972) from seaweed collected on Rottnest Island. Hallie was a regular visitor to the Island between 1929 and 1970 visiting mainly in winter with three friends, Catherine Summers, Rettie McGibbon and Grace Davidson. They would take horse trips to the West End, and around the Salt Lakes. Mrs Stow made many such hats for family and friends. Hettie’s daughter Mrs Sheila Plank donated the hat to the Rottnest Island Museum This hat is ... more

  5. Maternity dress
    1820 - 1830

    Riversdale National Trust

    It is a rare example of early nineteenth century dress. The cotton print is vibrant and in very good condition and has been very carefully placed to match on seams and sleeve bands. It is entirely hand stitched. The day dress with its fall front would have facilitated maternity and breast feeding as women were frequently pregant and had many children. This style of dress was very practical and probably the norm rather than the exception at this time. Its ... more

  6. A religious habit of the Sisters of Mercy
    1920 - 1950

    Institute of the Sisters of Mercy of Australia and Papua New Guinea. ( ISMAPNG)

    This assembly of garments constitutes the basic elements of the religious habit of the Sisters of Mercy.&nbsp; The <em>Mercy habit</em> was designed by the Foundress of the Sisters of Mercy, the Venerable Mother Catherine McAuley, in Dublin in 1831, and, with possibly only minor and inconspicuous alterations, was worn by all Sisters of Mercy until the middle of the twentieth century. The habit then began to be simplified and was finally discarded in favour of modern garb more suited to ... more

  7. Underwear belonging to Edith Lavinia Cameron
    1890 - 1899

    Canberra Museum and Gallery

    These under garments, worn by Edith Lavinia Cameron,&nbsp;are of considerable historical signficance because&nbsp;of their connection to one of Canberra's most prominent pastoral families (see Item ID 526) and their rarity. Underwear is poorly represented in museum collections, the extensive wear-and-tear caused by frequent use and laundering meant that garments were often thrown away before they could be collected and preserved. The status of underwear as everyday items of clothing, rather than reserved for special occassion also meant they weren't considered ... more

  8. Queensland Policewoman's Summer Uniform 1965 - 1970
    1965 - 1970

    Queensland Police Museum

    Females officially entering into the Queensland Police Force is not only a significant story in the gender history of Queensland, but represents the social and historical progression of the Queensland Police. The Queensland Policewoman's summer uniform was the first uniform to be assigned to women in Queensland. The short, drab olive green dress came with a belt to gather the waist and add a more feminine flair. It is not a decorative piece, its main function was to act as ... more

  9. A girl's smocked romper suit. Design "Old Friend".
    1996

    The Embroiderers' Guild of WA Inc

    This romper was based on a pattern by Margaret Herzfeld in the 1990s&nbsp;for the "Australian Smocking and Embroidery" magazine and for smocking lessons.&nbsp;Through her teaching and publications, Margaret helped to keep the old skills alive, adapted them, and made them available to new generations when they were not longer taught in schools. She used her considerable talents to teach in Western Australia and interstate, designed original garments for &ldquo;Australian Smocking and Embroidery" magazine and established a business making smocked garments ... more

  10. A young girl's smocked dress
    1997

    The Embroiderers' Guild of WA Inc

    In the 20th century, sewing was an integral part of the Educational Curriculum in schools throughout Australia and most girls learnt to smock. When these girls became mothers, this training was used to make items for the home and garments for the family. Hand embroidery was a pleasurable pastime and form of relaxation.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Post WWII, when jobs and resources were limited and scarce, there was neither the range nor variety of goods and those that were available, comparatively expensive.&nbsp; Quality ... more

  11. 1930s Gertrude Mary Vile 'make-do-and-mend' dress
    1920 - 1930

    The Australian Museum of Clothing and Textiles

    The Gertrude Mary Vile Depression-era dress is a cream Fuji silk dress, with an Eton collar, a patch pocket and buttons down front, from the 1920s though patched into the 30s. Gertrude, who lived at Gosforth, a rural community about fourteen kilometres from Maitland, patched and darned what was initially a best dress into a house dress, and it survives Gertrude as a statement on the hardship the people of Maitland and Australia at large experienced during the Great Depression, ... more

  12. Printed linen housecoat
    1940 - 1945

    Buda Historic Home and Garden

    This housecoat leads us into the remarkable story of the Leviny family of Castlemaine. Ernest Leviny (1818-1905) was an Hungarian silversmith and jeweller of some repute who in 1853 travelled to the Victorian goldfields and became one of the wealthiest residents in town. In 1864 he married Englishwoman, Bertha Hudson, and they moved into 'Buda', now a historic house museum. &nbsp;The Leviny's had 10 children, 4 boys and 6 girls. Five of their daughters lived at Buda House for most ... more

  13. Dress probably worn by Julia Johnston
    1836 - 1840

    Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences

    This dress is an extremely rare and significant example of provenanced early colonial Australian dress. Dating from around 1838, it is believed to have been worn by Julia Johnston, the daughter of Lieutenant George Johnston. This dress is an excellent example of late 1830s fashion with its fitted bodice, dropped leg-o-mutton full sleeve and full skirt. The dress appears to have been professionally made with details of piping and precise embroidery worked on the skirt. Julia was born at Annandale ... more

  14. Boys dress worn by John Marsden
    1802 - 1803

    Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences

    This dress was worn by John Marsden (1801 - 1803), the fourth of Reverend Samuel and Elizabeth Marsden's eight children. Reverend Samuel Marsden was an important figure in colonial Australia.&nbsp; As the chaplain to New South Wales, Marsden endeavoured, with some success, to improve the standard of morals and manners.&nbsp; This dress is a rare example of children's everyday wear from the early 1800s. Such an unassuming garment would not normally survive, but two-year-old John was wearing the dress when ... more

  15. Day dress made by David Jones Limited
    1890 - 1900

    Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences

    This dress is significant as the earliest labelled David Jones outfit in the Powerhouse Museum's collection. It was made by David Jones in Sydney about 1895. Established in 1838, David Jones is the oldest department store in the world still trading today. By 1880, fashionable ready-made clothing could be bought from city department stores like David Jones and Anthony Horderns. Alternatively, a length of fabric could be bought and made up into an outfit like this one for the customer. ... more

  16. 1860s Purple Grey Silk Women's Possible Half Mourning Dress
    1863 - 1865

    National Institute of Dramatic Art

    This purple grey day dress is estimated to originate from approximately 1863-65. It is the only possible half mourning dress in the NIDA Costume Research Collection and it was purchased from the Banana Room in Adelaide 1999. This garment is significant as it is an excellent example of possible mourning dress that is in good condition, and demonstrates good craftsmanship as the garment is sewn completely&nbsp;by hand. This dress has led to several points of research, which gave insight into ... more